The Fisher King and the Man in the Moon

Lindy Moone:

Beautiful:

Originally posted on busy mockingbird:

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Just because I don’t know Robin Williams doesn’t mean I can’t miss him.  Just because I miss him doesn’t mean I don’t feel loss for other people who maybe weren’t so much in the public eye, or that I don’t care about other more worldly events going on the news.

I’m not usually too affected by celebrity news, but I’ve been having a bit of a hard time with this one.   My WHOLE life, his movies, tv shows, and comedy has been there, in so many wonderful characters, in so many wonderful ways.  From when I first saw him as Mork as a kid, to now.  He inspired me, he made me laugh.  He touched so many people with the simplest of expressions.  He could make you laugh in one moment, and melt your heart in the next.  I don’t know another comedian who could do that.  He’s just always…

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Oh, How I LOVE Thee, AMAZON. Let me count the ways.

Lindy Moone:

And to think… just a few short years ago I thought the sweetest words in the English language would be “My Publisher.” Can’t wait to make my next book available for pre-order.

Wait? I don’t have to! I am Wonder Woman!

You know, cuz she was an Amazon? I may be getting carried away, here… I may need to blog about that later. Meanwhile, here’s an ode to Amazon, by Chris McMullen!

Originally posted on chrismcmullen:

Amazon Pic

When we first met, you were still young, yet already so grand.

More books than I’d ever seen in any bookstore.

Yet it wasn’t just the size that impressed me.

Or that you were accessible and easy to get.

There was something about the smile on your logo,

The friendly feel of your website,

The speedy shipping, with a free super saver,

And, mostly, the way you treated me, even after the sale.

Then you made your affordable prices even more attractive:

I could buy used copies for as little as a penny.

And I could sell my used books,

Even my used textbooks, and for great prices.

You did things for me that no other bookstore ever could.

You treated me like I was special,

Like I wasn’t just another customer.

You had me at the first one-click.

Then, out of the blue, when I thought you didn’t even…

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Caught in the Crossfire: Writers Waging War

Lindy Moone:

This is my fastest reblog evah! Go Christina!

Originally posted on A Spark in the Dark:

phoenix

I read something tonight that made me want to close my laptop and crawl under a blanket with a bottle of whiskey. All this flimflam between Hachette vs. Amazon and James Patterson with this crazy CNN spiel that made me feel like a complete idiot reading it. I couldn’t tell if it was me that was just not on his supersonic wavelength of superior literary prowess, or if what he was saying just made no damn sense for the most part. Anyway, if you want to read it, here’s the link. And if you read that one, I highly recommend its more coherent and totally awesome rebuttal by JA Konrath and Barry Eisler: Link here.

Okay, I’m going to be honest with you, as I always am. I hate politics. They stress me out. There are people out there who sort through all of this type of stuff and make sense…

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Dell Zero is here…

Lindy Moone:

I beta’d this book, too, so I figured I’d just steal John’s blog post about it. Very, very good book. I highly, highly (highly highly!) recommend it!

Originally posted on John L. Monk:

Ok, this message is to the 12.5 people out there who actually come to my sad little blog and read about my dumb word counts every week.  First of all, thank you, you rock.  Second of all, allow me to return the favor by telling you a rather astonishing piece of news: Dell Zero is now available on Amazon.

Dell Zero, by Carol Ervin, author of Girl on the Mountain, is hands-down one of the best dystopian sci-fi novels I’ve ever read (I beta’d it).  The story was so incredible, and the writing so good, that I recently offered to buy it for a friend of mine. And seriously, me buying stuff for people?  I don’t do that, I’m way too cheap. I mean look at the masthead on my blog — it’s my book cover, stretched wide.  Who does that, really?

dell-zero-ebookFor centuries, Vita-meds have kept the Chapter’s populace…

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…Because Someone Has to Sort out Eeyore.

I’ve been asked by Christina L. Rozelle, author of The Truth About Mud (the second-longest story in my troll anthology), to post “Why I Write.” If you have blog-hopped here from there, thank you for coming. If you have hopped here from elsewhere, please hop on over to the link above. (Not now! Sheesh!)

Of course, there are lots of answers to Christina’s question — a different one for every day. A month ago I might have answered glibly, “Because it’s fun to wantonly use adverbs,” and run away — figuratively, of course, since my ass was firmly planted in this chair and it was hot, so my elbows were hopelessly stuck to the desk. (They still are.)

Peske_Little_Girl_in_red_Dress

Here’s me, showing my panties to a cabbage

I started writing (actually printing) as a four-year-old, when I made up stories about the family that lived in my closet — the closet I shared with my little sister. In that family, everyone had their own room, even the Mommy and Daddy (why should they have to share, after all?) and a sock doll named Eegie and Tuffy the cat. (Who, it must be noted, had the biggest room.)

Today, I could say I write to bask in the glow of reviews (which, frankly, are few and far between, possibly due to my habit of aggressive non-promotion). Yesterday’s new Hyperlink from Hell reviews, my first on Amazon UK, included such head-swellers as:

“The cleverest piece of fiction I’ve ever read.”

(and)

“Somewhere in the multiverse there is a version of me who hasn’t read this book. I feel sorry for her.”

A couple of days ago, if asked why I write, I might have said “Because writing and reading are comforting” and referenced my novel-in-progress, Riding the Bull, the sequel to the above-lauded (and larded) book. In RTB, a character relates this quote, from A. A. Milne’s Piglet, in The House at Pooh Corner:

“Supposing a tree fell down, Pooh, while we were underneath it?”

“Supposing it didn’t,” said Pooh after careful thought.

 (See? Comforting!)

Here’s that same character explaining why she became a psychiatrist:

It’s partly thanks to Pooh and Piglet—and lonely, depressed “Eeyore” the donkey—that I became a psychiatrist. I made a list of promises to my mother before she died; the first was to “Take care of Daddy.” The last was, “And if nobody fixes Eeyore, Mommy, I’ll sort him out.”

I was six. I still have that list, and everything’s checked off but Eeyore.

So I write because it’s comforting, and to make things right.

I also write because I’m kinda smart (the Internet says my IQ is 134, so it must be true!), and because I’m kinda dumb (too befuddled to be a waiter, for example; I really admire people who can do that), and because it’s fascinating — to me, at least — to see those two sides of me duke it out on the page. (This is not a pretty spectator sport; it’s hard to see exactly what’s going on — kind of like two bulldogs fighting in a bag.)*

My brain works, when it works, in mysterious ways. I am a curious sort. Just yesterday I was wondering if anyone else’s panties suddenly, irrevocably roll down when they stretch, yawn, or sneeze — and the median age when people give up the valiant fight and start wiping from the front. So I write to explore the gap between the odd way my mind works and the way individual readers’ minds work. I want to know if anyone “gets” me, I guess. (And if they do, I worry about them. I really do.)

But mostly I write for the money. I sold one book this month, so far. In Germany. I made .30 Euro. (Methinks I’ll buy a pony…!)

Or maybe a donkey.

I guess I must write… because it’s fun. Nothing else comes close. (Except, of course, painting pictures on a closet wall.)

 

 

*Please do not worry about the bulldogs. They aren’t real.


 

Peske’s “Little Girl in Red Dress” courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Other illustrations are Ernest Shepard’s drawings for A. A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh series.

 

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Kindle Unlimited—Good or Bad for Authors?

Lindy Moone:

An excellent breakdown of what’s going on… with Kindle Unlimited! (Thank you, Chris McMullen.)

Originally posted on chrismcmullen:

Read Me

Read Unlimited Kindle E-books

Today, Amazon introduced Kindle Unlimited:

  • For $9.99 per month, a customer can now read (and listen to) an unlimited number of Kindle e-books.
  • There are 600,000 books to choose from. The books are enrolled in KDP Select.
  • All KDP Select books are automatically included. (But authors can opt out of KDP Select by completing a form. See below.)
  • Customers don’t need to be in Amazon Prime to enjoy the benefits of Kindle Unlimited.

You can read more about it at Amazon, including the terms of use: https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=hp_left_v4_sib?ie=UTF8&nodeId=201550610.

Authors can learn more about it at Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), where there is also a new form for those who wish to opt out of KDP Select: https://kdp.amazon.com/help?topicId=AA9BSAGNO1YJH.

Is Kindle Unlimited Good for Authors?

In order to participate in Kindle Unlimited, an e-book must be enrolled in KDP Select.

Here are some advantages of enrolling in…

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Pub bans the word ‘So’ from beginning of sentences

Lindy Moone:

I see a price list for offending words and phrases. “Personally” should cost a tenner. “In the fullness of time”? A lifetime ban.

Originally posted on The Evening Harold:

so jar

Sewing club has moved to a new venue.

A pub in Harold has banned customers from starting their sentences with the word ‘so’, in a crack-down on pseudo-scientific intellectualism.

On the bar of the Squirrel Lickers Arms a ‘So’ box now stands, replacing the well-rattled swears jar. And it’s already beginning to fill up, according to Eddie the landlord. He explained how he got the idea.

“So I noti…b****cks”, said Eddie, flipping a coin into the container. “I noticed a lot of people in here think they can sound all knowledgeable and reasonable, just by adding the offending word to the beginning of any old shite”, he explained.

“So I took the…oh for f***s sake…(*chink*)…I took the initiative and decided to fine people for their cod GCSE chemistry report cock-whiskery. I won’t have people in here turning the air litmus blue.”

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